The 2015 Australian Open Uses Custom Consoles to create temporary control room

Broadcast furniture maker Custom Consoles has designed a temporary flyaway production system for UK-based systems integrator Gearhouse Broadcast for 2015 Australian Open tennis tournament, January 19 to February 1.

Gearhouse Broadcast has chosen more than two dozen Custom Consoles Module-R technical control furniture and two EditOne desks for the edit suites and is providing consultancy and project management throughout the project. The EditOne series desks are flat packable, which makes them very compact to deliver on site and easy to assemble and integrate into the overall control room.

“This is a very large and prestigious contract,” said Kevin Moorhouse, Managing Director of Gearhouse Broadcast. “The Module-R products provided a highly efficient basis for us to specify a furniture system that we could confidently assemble on site. Equally important, Module-R provides easy access to equipment and cabling during installation as well as for any required technical maintenance.”

Gary Fuller, Custom Consoles Sales Manager on the project, said The Australian Open project embraces a wide range of desk sizes and configurations. The Module-R desks include a single-operator EVS varispeed-replay control station, a dual-operator robotics control desk, senior technical director position, three-operator camera control desk, a two-operator quality control desk, three-operator Rod Laver Arena production control, a shared two-operator production control desk for Hisense, Margaret Court and Courts 2/3, a shared two-operator control desk for Courts 6 and 8, plus a three-operator world feed production control room desk.

All 26 Module-R desks feature durable grey Marmoleum work-surfaces and oak veneer. They incorporate desktop level 1U-wide rack-mounting equipment pods with up to 17U bays. Each of the production control desks is fitted with an integral video production mixer. The desks have the same high strength and rigidity as the standard Module-R series but are designed for easy transport and on-site assembly.

A mix-and-matchable control room furniture system, the Custom Consoles Module-R product range allows aesthetically attractive and long-life desks to be configured to meet specific shapes and dimensions from a selection of high-quality pods, base sections, 19 inch rack housings, worktops, end-panel modules and legs. Coordinated desk pods are available as single-bay sections with up 10U chassis capacity.

Developed for use in video editing suites, broadcast graphics areas and audio studio control rooms, Custom Consoles EditOne desks go beyond the traditional rectangular configuration by using sculpted MDF support panels rather than metal legs. The curved theme is carried through to the desktop and a raised monitor shelf. Integral equipment pods are provided. An auxiliary equipment pedestal with an additional 11U of rack space and an integral worktop is available. Designed for flat-pack delivery, the desk can be assembled in less than an hour using the supplied Allen key and screwdriver.

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