Qligent to Debut As-Run Feature for Vision Monitoring and Analysis Platform at IBC2018

Qligent will provide an As-Run report focused on verifying vital events in distribution streams, helping broadcasters protect against revenue loss.

Qligent has developed a new As-Run feature exclusive to its Vision platform. The new feature is set to debut at the upcoming IBC2018.

As integrated within Vision, the new As-Run feature uses an imported as-run log to analyze whether vital secondary program events, like SCTE-35 ad insertion triggers and ratings watermarks, aired as planned, and also improves the compliance verification process of loudness, EPG tables, and closed-captioning. The application then produces a consolidated as-run report as an overlay to the program schedule in near-real-time.

This new capability provides monitoring-by-exception to pinpoint precisely where, when and why secondary events failed to execute properly along any of a broadcaster’s downstream distribution channels. This also saves significant amounts of time and effort by enabling users to search for specific clips or segments of primary program events, such as TV shows, commercials, promos and IDs, as well as secondary events. Once located, the search function can link them directly to where that item is in the program schedule, and they can also play or export the selected clip segment.

With this new As-Run feature—and other recently added modules like MATCH for programmatic error detection—the Vision platform’s comprehensive analytical capabilities now encompass four major areas of concern: the detection of compliance errors (regulatory/SLA), objective errors (QoS), subjective errors (QoE), and programmatic errors (expected presentation to the end user). By leveraging Vision’s broader data analytics processing, broadcasters now have unprecedented visibility of their entire distribution chain, including the terrestrial, cable, satellite, IPTV, mobile, OTT, and social media services that deliver their branded shows to a potentially global audience.

“Until now, there hasn’t been an easy way to determine if SCTE-35 ad insertion triggers occurred at the right moment in relation to the network’s planned commercial break,” said Ted Korte, COO, Qligent. “If the playout of an ad triggers too soon or too late, it could clip the head or tail of a spot, resulting in the need for a ‘make good,’ and a potential loss of revenue. And if closed captioning isn’t present, or audio exceeds acceptable loudness levels, a station could incur fines for non-compliance. By calling attention to secondary event anomalies in relation to where in the programming, this new feature can save broadcasters money by reducing their exposure to fines and lost advertising revenues.”

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