Dielectric With ATSC 3.0-Compatible Spectrum Repack Antennas at the 2018 IBC Show

At the 2018 IBC Show, Dielectric will be showcasing a broad array of spectrum repack antennas engineered to deliver the enhanced performance required by the next-generation broadcast standard, ATSC3.0.

Dielectric will highlight the many features designed into their ATSC 3.0 compatible UHF/VHF repack antennas and components, including safety margins that withstand the higher peak to average power ratios (PAPR) of the new standard.

The company is also preparing broadcasters for ATSC 3.0 with its FutureFill feature, which is included as standard in every center-fed, high-power repack antenna it manufactures — at no extra charge. FutureFill increases power density by 7- to 9-dB close to the tower, and reduces the main lobe gain by 1.2-to 1.4-dB. 

The broadcaster can, if additional transmitter power is available, increase the TPO to overcome the main lobe gain reduction, or use Single Frequency Network (SFN) technology to enhance reception at the periphery of the service area.

FutureFill allows an existing ATSC 1.0 antenna to be adjusted so that its performance is boosted for ATSC 3.0, without having to be taken down from the tower or replaced. With the transition from ATSC 1.0 to ATSC 3.0, there is a greater focus on power density, higher vertical polarization ratios and polarization diversity, as well as the use of single frequency networks (SFNs), all of which boost reception across the coverage area. 

“Since ATSC 3.0 uses OFDM modulation rather than ATSC 1.0’s 8-VSB, the PAPR is 2 to 3db higher. Not only do our ATSC 3.0-compatible repack antennas and filters meet these higher peak power demands, but our band-tunable filters are also being tuned to ATSC 3.0 before they ship from our facility. In this way, the installed equipment won’t need to be re-tuned later should the customer decide to switch to ATSC 3.0.”
— Jay Martin, vice president of sales, Dielectric
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