SLR Magic Anamorphic Adapter Now Available For Fujinon MK Lenses

SLR Magic have launched their new Anamorphot 1,33x-65 anamorphic adapter for Fujinon MK lenses. This new adapter accommodates lenses with a front element size of up to 65mm, and has a rear thread size of 82mm.

SLR Magic have collaborated with Fujifilm, and optimised this new adapter for their ever MK range of zooms, namely, the Fujinon MK 50-135mm T2.9. The adapter will mount directly to the Fujinon zoom and when mounted on a Fujinon MK 50-135mm, the integration of the adapter to lens appears like a singular unit.As the adapter features an internal focus design, the overall housing maintains the same size while focusing and front diameter can accommodate any industry 114mm clamp-on matte box. Also, the addition of a front thread will allow the use of screw in filters and diopters. This new larger size makes the 1,33x-65 adapter incredibly versatile and adaptable to a wide range of prime lenses and zooms, but still compact in size and form factor.

Trying to achieve a true anamorphic “look” in post cannot be emulated or faked. By cropping a standard 16:9 aspect ratio using a spherical lens, it discards 25% resolution of the overall image. Using the SLR Magic 1,33x-65 will preserve all pixels from the sensor and give you 33% more optical resolution and field of view from the camera. Additionally, the close focus distance for the 1.33x-65 is 4 feet.

The SLR Magic Anamorphot 1,33x-65 has been manufactured to extend the accessibility of anamorphic shooting to a larger variety of camera and lens packages.

Technical specifications

  • SLR Magic Anamorphot 1.33x – 65
  • Lens Type: Anamorphic adapter
  • Front diameter for Matte Box: Φ114
  • Objective front filter thread: Φ112
  • Objective rear filter thread: Φ82
  • Lens Coating: Multi Coated
  • Close Focus: dependent on taking lens compatibility
  • Weight: 780g
  • Let us know what you think…

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