Articles You May Have Missed – July 25, 2018

Here are two cutting-edge articles you may have missed.

The first article examines how Google is inching closer to dominating the set top box market and what that could mean to operators. While operators have tried to avoid the behemoth, the allure of Android TV with its operator tier and custom launcher is overcoming resistance. Learn how Google is making inroads in the article, “Google Leaves RDK Trailing with Android TV Operator Tier.”

The second article showcased this week will help you gain a solid basis and understanding about IP routing. Consultant Tony Orme reviews how IP switching technology has entered the broadcast and production facility and reviews some of the benefits it offers. Read the article, “A Brief History of IP - Routing IP Networks.”

Com Hem of Sweden is one of the first operators to deploy Android TV Operator tier with a full range of features.

Com Hem of Sweden is one of the first operators to deploy Android TV Operator tier with a full range of features.

It has been three years since the launch of Android TV and seven years on from the original unveiling of its predecessor Google TV. Today, pay TV operators are finally adopting Google’s Android TV on a large scale and one casualty could be Comcast’s RDK (Reference Design Kit) platform introduced around 2012. The RDK had a similar goal to accelerate deployment of next-generation video combining broadcast and broadband services through pre-integrated, open-source software to drive customer-premises equipment (CPE) including set top boxes (STBs).

The risk for operators is that should Google succeed, it ends up well placed to move in and sell not just content but also connected services in the smart home domain. Learn more, “Google Leaves RDK Trailing with Android TV Operator Tier.”

The phrase “network routing” is liberally used on broadcast forums. However, what exactly does it mean to route an IP datagram? Moreover, why is it important for television and radio facilities?

Traditionally, SDI, MADI and AES are the common forms of signal distribution. A combination of X-Y routing matrices and patch cords are used to distribute signals around a facility. One-to-one connectivity is required to maximize transfer of power between source and destination through impedance matching. This sometimes requires racks of distribution amplifiers and X-Y routing switchers.

IP routing solves many of these problems because audio and video signals are treated as pure data. Perhaps IP’s greatest strength is that it does not care what type of data it is transporting in its payload. Learn more about leveraging the benefits of IP in the article, “A Brief History of IP - Routing IP Networks.”

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