Panasonic Joins With IMT Vislink For Wireless Transmission

IMT Vislink has partnered with Panasonic to give customers of both companies a robust wireless video transmission and receive solution directly from the camera. IMT Vislink’s HCAM transmitter offers user-interchangeable RF modules and a range of software options that combine seamlessly with Panasonic’s line of broadcast and ENG cameras.

Users of Panasonic’s AK-UC4000 camera will get a software upgrade in September 2018 that includes the capability for 4K output via one of the 12G-SDI outputs from the camera head. When combined with the IMT Vislink HCAM transmitter, the AK-UC3000, AK-HC5000 and AK-UC4000 cameras will all allow Full HD wireless video transmission (as well as 4K transmission using the UC3000 and UC4000 cameras).

Dean Chettra, Global Channel Manager at IMT Vislink, said the HCAM represents the next generation of HEVC 4K UHD wireless transmitters, supporting applications such as ENG and sports broadcasts. The HCAM comes with configurable mounting options and intuitive video interfaces.

Stefan Hofmann, Sales Engineering Manager at Panasonic, says, “With user-interchangeable RF modules and a range of software options, the HCAM continues the line of innovative, high performance wireless camera systems from IMT Vislink. We think that our users will find that the joint development will ensure that they have a smooth workflow for live wireless broadcast.”

The HCAM features interchangeable, dual SFP modules supporting quad 3/6/12G SDI/HDMI/Fiber Optic/SMPTE 2022-6 HD-SDI over IP interfaces as well as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth control via a dedicated Android and iOS application.

IMT Vislink is currently shipping its external wireless solutions for the AK-UC3000 and AK-UC4000. This is based on the existing HCAM transceiver unit, which supports HD and UHD on a switchable basis. 

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