IBC2018 Show Event Channel

Everything you need to know for the show and exhibitors.

Click here

Hammerking Productions Taps AJA Kumo For Multi-Signal Routing During “King of Hammers” Event

Every year in February the world’s top ULTRA4 racers converge in Johnson Valley, CA to compete in a week-long series of off-road races spanning more than 200 miles of rocky desert terrain. Called “The King of Hammers,” the race draws in more than 60,000 spectators and is broadcast live to audiences via the ULTRA4 racing website and Livestream.com, with highlights streamed to YouTube and Facebook Live.

Hammerking Productions, which runs the week-long production, typically captures and streams more than seven hours of footage a day to fans on-site and online. It also produces a compilation show covering the race series for NBC Sports.  With this year’s production involving multiple camera sources and destinations, the Hammerking team selected AJA Video Systems’ Kumo 6464 compact router for SDI signal distribution.

The Kumo 6464 delivers 64 inputs and 64 outputs of 3G-SDI video and audio in a compact 4RU profile. It features web-based network control and supports any SDI-based signal up to 3G-SDI including HD and 4K/UltraHD. Kumo 6464 is built to the same quality video standards as all AJA Kumo products and ideal for productions where size, routing capacity and longer cable runs are key.

The Kumo 6464 delivers 64 inputs and 64 outputs of 3G-SDI video and audio in a compact 4 rack units.

The Kumo 6464 delivers 64 inputs and 64 outputs of 3G-SDI video and audio in a compact 4 rack units.

The Kumo 6464 router was used extensively this year, as Hammerking Productions deployed more than 22 cameras to capture a range of race angles in the highest quality HD (1920 by 1080p). Ten remote cameras were stationed throughout the desert floor, each 30km apart; two drone cameras and a camera-equipped helicopter flew over the course; and a handful of local cable-in cameras were stationed near the start/finish, in the event that safety shots might be needed should a microwave signal transmission issue arise.

Transmitted via microwave, remote and drone camera signals were fed to a production truck housing 13 screens, the Kumo 6464 router and a host of other production gear. Stationed at the start/finish line, an OB truck was used to stream each race in real-time, as well as to broadcast race highlights packages online. Content could also be viewed on-site via a 30-foot JumboTron, 20-foot JumboTrons near the race start/finish lines, and TVs located near the lakebed and in vendor tents/trucks.

Drone camera signals were converted from HDMI to SDI, input to KUMO 6464, and then followed the same path as the remote cameras.

Drone camera signals were converted from HDMI to SDI, input to KUMO 6464, and then followed the same path as the remote cameras.

Virtually all of the video production outputs ran through the AJA Kumo 6464 router. Remote camera feeds were first passed through an H.264 encoder over a microwave network and received by the router. Signals were then decoded by an H.264 decoder and routed through Kumo 6464 and output through a 16-channel multiviewer.

The team also used Kumo 6464 for video switching to a NewTek TriCaster and replay system. Remote camera feeds came out of the TriCaster back through Kumo 6464, and were split off to local video, then input into Livestream Studio, and Facebook Live. Drone camera signals were converted from HDMI to SDI, input to Kumo 6464, and then followed the same path as the remote cameras. Additional inputs into Kumo 6464 were used for replay and to display maps, graphics and other visuals from PCs and Macs.

Helicopter camera footage was also recorded to an AJA Ki Pro Mini recorder, and when the helicopter landed, it was ingested into the live show. Content was then archived for marketing materials and the compilation show for NBC Sports.

Let us know what you think…

Log-in or Register for free to post comments…

You might also like...

Articles You May Have Missed – June 20, 2018

Until now, 4K/UHD and high dynamic range (HDR), in many ways, has been little more than a science project, as manufacturers have struggled to convince production entities of the long-term practicality and viability. Fears of overly complex pipelines and…

Broadcast For IT - Part 10 - SDI

In this series of articles, we will explain broadcasting for IT engineers. Television is an illusion, there are no moving pictures and todays broadcast formats are heavily dependent on decisions engineers made in the 1930’s and 1940’s, and in this art…

The Benefits of Cloud-Based Video Service Operations

With near unfettered access to portable media players of all types and faster networks, consumers are increasingly migrating to video providers that serve them best. Quality and reliability are the key drivers for loyal and recurring engagement.

To Deploy HEVC, Users Must Choose What Patent Pool To Dive Into

While it’s clear that High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) is superior in compression performance to its AVC predecessor codec format, getting the essential patent holders of the standard to agree on royalty terms for use has proved to be f…

2018 NAB Show Highlights Complex State of the Industry

Following numerous private conversations and panel discussions at the recent 2018 NAB Show, it’s become clear that broadcasters are being challenged like never before to hold the line on CapEx spending while delivering more content across their linear platforms. Because o…