RME Widens Networking Choice With Dante And AVB Interfaces

German specialist manufacturer RME, which produces a range of audio conversion units and microphone pre-amplifiers, expanded its Digiface range of interfaces at the 2018 NAB Show with the introduction of two new mobile networking products, one for the Dante audio over IP (AoIP) protocol and one for the Audio Video Bridging (AVB) standard.

The two new models expand RME's offering of interconnection devices, which already support MADI (Multichannel Audio Digital Interface), AES/EBU digital and the FireWire serial bus interface. Digiface Dante can be used for both USB and standalone applications and was developed to meet the growing demand for the AoIP protocol in broadcasting. It is able to transmit up to 64 Dante channels and 64 MADI channels over one USB 3.0 connection.

Digiface Dante builds on RME's existing Dante PCIe card but is a fully mobile device that can be used on location with power from either an external supply or a USB bus. MADI capability is provided through the integration of Mac and Windows drivers from RME's MADIface range. This allows the unit to be used as a Dante to MADI converter as well as a standalone Dante transmission device.

With the Digiface AVB, RME says it is looking forward to the future of audio networking. AVB has fallen behind Dante and its rival in AoIP, RAVENNA, in recent years but is still being promoted as a viable standard for the interconnection of both audio and video. The Digiface AVB uses the open IEEE 802.1 protocol, which is part of the AVB standard, and has the capacity for up to 128 channels of audio to be streamed to a compatible network through a USB 3.0 port. A further 128 channels can be sent to the network computer, with both connections running at up to 192kHz.

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