Heil Introduces the PR 77D Microphone at NAB

Heil Sound introduced the PR 77D, a large-diaphragm microphone designed to provide focused directionality, full-range response and a vintage appearance for use in broadcast, podcast, recording and live stage applications.

Heil said the PR 77D features a classic side-address design based upon popular RCA microphones from the 1950s and 60s. Its cardioid polar pattern delivers 40 dB of attenuation 180 degrees off-axis, resulting in a tight pickup area and minimized bleed. It is perfect for any application that requires a smooth, flat response over a wide frequency range, excellent transient response, great speech articulation and low intermodulation distortion (IMD).

The PR 77D achieves its exceptional performance via a large, one-inch, low-mass voice coil encompassed by a powerful magnet structure using a mixture of neodymium, iron and boron. Special attention has been paid to the phasing plug assembly to provide exceptional 180-degree, off-axis rear rejection of over -40 dB. Simultaneously, the front pattern allows the user to move about freely in front of the element with no change in response.

Unique to the PR 77D is a two-position switch allowing the user to select optimal response frequency characteristics between voice and music applications. The voice position rolls the audio off at 120 Hz at -6 dB per octave, whereas the music position removes the filter and uses the entire audio spectrum of 60 Hz to 16 kHz.

The mic has a dynamic element with cardioid pickup pattern. The output is a three-pin XLR connector. Frequency response is 60 Hz – 16 kHz (music – no filter)/ 120 Hz – 16 kHz (voice – filter on). The mic’s impedance is 600 ohms balanced. The maximum SPL is 148 dB and output level is -53.9 dB @ 1 kHz. The mic weighs 24.5 ounces.

It has a standard ⅝-inch – 27 microphone stand thread and can be mounted directly to booms or bases. The PR 77D retails for $249.00.

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