Stage Tec Launches Fibre and IP Interface for NEXUS Router

German mixing console and routing developer Stage Tec expanded its audio over IP (AoIP) capability with the introduction of the NEXUS fibre and IP interface (XFIP) during the 2018 NAB Show. The new board is designed for the NEXUS audio networking system and features full compliance with the AES67 AoIP interoperability standard.

The NEXUS XFIP is a joint development between Stage Tec and fellow German company DirectOut, known for its range of converters, embedders and pre-amplifiers. Based on DirectOut's AES67.IO unit, the XFIP corresponds to the Stage Tec RIF67 AES67 router interface, introduced in 2017, and is part of the Base Device 19-inch racks designed for the NEXUS.

A single XFIP can accommodate 256 channels in and 256 channels out at the NEXUS end. The AES67.IO device handles AoIP processing of up to 256 channels in a total of 32 streams. This module enables the setting up of a non-proprietary audio network on an AoIP connection, while the XFIP itself is able to handle redundant audio transmission complying to the SMPTE ST2022-7 Seamless Protection Switching standard. There is also a RAVENNA option, with the XFIP additionally offering two SFP (Small Form-factor Pluggable) ports for future operations.

The XFIP AES67 interface is configured using a web browser, while its status is monitored on the NEXUS router. The XFIP works on a plug-and-play basis, with automatic identification and set-up through the network. It is backwards compatible, meaning it is usable on existing NEXUS installations.

"We offer the NEXUS Fibre and IP Interface to customers when they require small, cost-effective audio networks without a NEXUS STAR router. Even if customers do have a STAR router but no room for additional boards, they can use XFIP as an alternative," says Alexander Nemes, head of sales at Stage Tec. "The XFIP also follows the recommendations of the standards-based AIMS Roadmap with the goal of SMPTE ST2110."

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