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Sennheiser Unveils Essential Line of Headset and Lavalier Microphones

Sennheiser has introduced the “Essential” line of headsets and microphones — a mid-range line for small broadcasters and other users seeking cost effective gear.

Sennheiser said the new lines closes the gap between the company’s high-end solutions for broadcast, music and theatre and the microphones supplied with its evolution wireless series.

Available from July, 2018, the microphones connect to bodypack transmitters with 3-pin and 3.5 mm jack connectors, and are a good choice for houses of worship, smaller broadcasting companies, the education sector, corporate customers and small and medium-sized theatres.

“As its name suggests, the Essential range brings the accepted core acoustics of the HSP 2 and MKE 2 to a new audience at an attractive price,” said Jannik Schentek, product manager at Sennheiser. “The microphones are uncomplicated in use and facilitate quick handling.”

The HSP Essential Omni features an omni-directional capsule and a stainless-steel headband that easily adjusts to accommodate a wide range of head sizes. Available in black and beige, the HSP Essential Omni offers customers a choice of a 3.5 mm jack connector for use with XS Wireless and evolution wireless, or a 3-pin connector for professional wireless series from 2000 through to Digital 9000. The cable is firmly attached to the headset and will not get lost in the hectic of an event.

The MKE Essential Omni is also available in black and beige and comes with either a 3-pin or 3.5 mm jack connector. The omni-directional lavalier microphone is supplied with a crocodile clip and a pop windshield, but can also be used with the range of MKE 2 mounting accessories.

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