Remote Live Production at NAB BEIT Sessions

At the Broadcast Engineering and Information Technology Conference (BEITC), part of the 2018 NAB Show, solutions partners Calrec, Grass Valley and Net Insight will explain in a joint presentation how a shared technology approach is already providing broadcasters with a complete, proven and easy way to generate significantly more live content. Using wide area networks, broadcasters can reduce on-site presence, with the majority of the crew remaining at the main production center. This can reduce costs on major productions, or enable the coverage of minority sports, previously excluded on cost grounds.

Tasked with producing more live coverage with squeezed resources, broadcasters are turning to at-home/REMI (remote-integration model) production. Correctly implemented, at-home production can reduce the movement of people and equipment; increase the utilization of equipment; reduce on-site set-up times; and maximize the efficiency of production teams. 

Until recently there have been three major barriers to success, namely: 

  1. Latency and how you mitigate it; 
  2. Control and how you extend workflows to the venue; and Infrastructure issues, notably 
  3. How to transport raw signals back to base. 

Klaus Weber of Grass Valley, Peter Walker of Calrec Audio and Larissa Görner of Net Insight will join forces to speak about the major challenges with at-home production and how these issues can be solved. The speakers will explain how a shared technology approach is already providing broadcasters with a complete, proven and easy way to generate significantly more live content. Live Remote Production 2.0 is where workflows are completely distributed and set up is plug and play. This session will clearly explain how, by interconnecting and orchestrating distributed production resources over Wide Area Networks, broadcasters can significantly improve their operational efficiency and flexibility.

The presentation provides a forum for each company to bring its specific industry experience to the discussion. Weber will speak about video and camera transmission, Walker is highlighting audio production,and Görneris focusing on signal transport. Together, they represent the main components of a remote production and will speak to the way each company’s solutions provide better video, audio and transport workflows for at-home production. By utilizing a complementary technology approach, broadcasters are equipped with a complete, proven and easy way to generate significantly more live content.

The BEIT conference runs Saturday, April 7 to Thursday, April 12, 2018 and is open to holders of qualifying NAB Show conference passes. With a focus on IP, cybersecurity, workflows and ATSC 3.0, the conference presents the opportunity for broadcast and IT engineers to catch up with the latest technologies.

To register follow this link and for a $100 discount on the conference flex pass, quote this code when registering: EP18.

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