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Nimbus Data Launches 100 Terabyte SSD Drive Technology

Move over Sandisk, Nimbus Data has announced the ExaDrive DC100, the largest capacity (100 terabytes) SSD flash drive ever produced.

Featuring more than 3x the capacity of the closest competitor, the Nimbus Data ExaDrive DC100 also draws 85 percent less power per terabyte. These innovations reduce total cost of ownership per terabyte by 42 percent compared to competing enterprise SSDs, helping accelerate flash memory adoption in both cloud infrastructure and edge computing.

“As flash memory prices decline, capacity, energy efficiency and density will become the critical drivers of cost reduction and competitive advantage,” said Thomas Isakovich, CEO and founder of Nimbus Data. “The ExaDrive DC100 meets these challenges for both data center and edge applications, offering unmatched capacity in an ultra-low power design.”

While existing SSDs focus on speed, the DC100 is optimized for capacity and efficiency. With its patent-pending multiprocessor architecture, the DC100 supports much greater capacity than monolithic flash controllers. Using 3D NAND, the DC100 provides enough flash capacity to store 20 million songs, 20,000 HD movies, 2,000 iPhones or a practically infinite amount of 4K video storage in a device small enough to fit in a back pocket.

For data centers, a single rack of DC100 SSDs can achieve over 100 petabytes of raw capacity. Data centers can reduce power, cooling and rack space costs by 85 percent per terabyte, enabling more workloads to move to flash at the lowest possible total cost of ownership.

Featuring the same 3.5-inch form factor and SATA interface used by hard drives, the ExaDrive DC100 is plug-and-play compatible with hundreds of storage and server platforms. The DC100’s low-power (0.1 watts/TB) and portability also make it well-suited for edge and IoT applications.

The DC100 achieves up to 100,000 IOps (read or write) and up to 500 MBps throughput. This equally-balanced read/write performance is ideal for a wide range of workloads, from big data and machine learning to rich content and cloud infrastructure.

The ExaDrive DC100 is protected by an unlimited endurance guarantee for five years. By doing away with confusing drive-writes-per-day restrictions, the DC100 offers peace of mind, reduces hardware refresh cycles and eliminates costly support renewals.

Embedded capacitors ensure that buffered data is safely protected if there is a sudden power loss. Encryption, multiple ECC processors, and a secure-erase feature ensure data security. The DC100 offers a mean time between failures (MTBF) of 2.5 million hours.

The ExaDrive DC series includes both 100 TB and 50 TB models. It is currently sampling to strategic customers and will be generally available in summer 2018.

Pricing will be similar to existing enterprise SSDs on a per terabyte basis while offering 85 percent lower operating costs. Overall, the ExaDrive DC series will cost 42 percent less per terabyte over a five-year period compared to existing enterprise SSDs.

This TCO advantage factors in the superior endurance, balanced read/write performance, power savings, cooling savings, rack space savings, component reduction and lower refresh costs.

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