Articles You May Have Missed – March 21, 2018

As the broadcast and production industries gear up for the NAB 2018 convention, it’s worthwhile to consider the leading-edge technologies and solutions that are already proving successful. These two articles look at both IP and audio solutions that help meet the entertainment demands of today’s audiences. The articles showcase how broadcast and recording professionals are increasing leveraging IP and even old-style audio solutions to excite audiences around the world.

NEP Australia is building a fleet of IP-enabled live production trucks supported by dual ingest production centers.

NEP Australia is building a fleet of IP-enabled live production trucks supported by dual ingest production centers.

Because greenfield facilities remain scarce, few companies have, or will spend, the resources to build something new from the ground up while still operating a full SDI suite. One exception is live broadcast trucks. These production studios on wheels are designed to perform highly focused tasks and little else. Because these studios are not burdened with the kind of mundane tasks traditional broadcasters must perform, these studios-on-wheels can leverage the latest IP solutions inside to increase efficiency while producing eye-popping video and audio content.

Learn more about the technology stuffed inside these behemoths in the article, “Live Production Trucks Become Test Beds for IP.”

With a single microphone, performers can listen to each other acoustically. It’s a production technique that is often overlooked.

With a single microphone, performers can listen to each other acoustically. It’s a production technique that is often overlooked.

From the earliest days of professional sound, a single microphone was used in broadcast studios and on stage to capture everything — from actors doing drama to music performers. Then, when the close-miking multitrack era arrived, the trend disappeared. Now single-mic sound is back and growing in popularity.

But multitrack recording meant that each element of the sound required a separate microphone. With close miking, the mix was not live, but made in post-production on an audio console or DAW. Today, groups seeking to sound unique, are going back to the old ways — often performing with one mic on both broadcasts and in live performances.

Learn more about this recording and performance technique in the article, “Single-Microphone Sound Makes a Comeback.”

Content is King—Keep it Safe! At @Avid Connect 2018, The Broadcast Bridge’s Brad Dick will be moderating a panel discussion with companies & industry experts at the forefront of media security.

Join him in Las Vegas from April 6-8. Register at www.avidconnect2018.com/register

#AvidConnect

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