Samsung Begins Mass Production of 30.72 TB SSD Drives

Samsung has announced that it has begun mass producing the industry’s largest capacity Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) solid state drive (SSD) – the PM1643 – for use in next-generation enterprise storage systems.

Leveraging Samsung’s latest V-NAND technology with 64-layer, three-bit 512-gigabit (Gb) chips, the 30.72 terabyte (TB) drive delivers twice the capacity and performance of the previous 15.36TB high-capacity lineup introduced in March, 2016.

This breakthrough was made possible by combining 32 of the new 1TB NAND flash packages, each comprised of 16 stacked layers of 512Gb V-NAND chips. These super-dense 1TB packages allow for approximately 5,700 five-gigabyte (GB), full HD movie files to be stored within a mere 2.5-inch storage device.

In addition to the doubled capacity, performance levels have risen significantly and are nearly twice that of Samsung’s previous generation high-capacity SAS SSD. Based on a 12Gb/s SAS interface, the new PM1643 drive features random read and write speeds of up to 400,000 IOPS and 50,000 IOPS, and sequential read and write speeds of up to 2,100MB/s and 1,700 MB/s, respectively.

These represent approximately four times the random read performance and three times the sequential read performance of a typical 2.5-inch SATA SSD.

Samsung reached the new capacity and performance enhancements through several technology progressions in the design of its controller, DRAM packaging and associated software. Included in these advancements is an efficient controller architecture that integrates nine controllers from the previous high-capacity SSD lineup into a single package, enabling a greater amount of space within the SSD to be used for storage.

You might also like...

Data Recording: Burst Errors - Part 20

The first burst error correcting code was the Fire Code, which was once widely used on hard disk drives. Here we look at how it works and how it was used.

Data Recording: Cyclic Redundancy Checks - Part 19

The CRC (cyclic redundancy check) was primarily an error detector, but it did allow some early error correction systems to be implemented. There are many different CRCs but they all work in much the same way, which is that the…

Data Recording: Modulo Counting - Part 18

The mathematics of finite fields and sequences seems to be a long way from everyday life, but it happens in the background every time we use a computer and without it, an explanation of modern error correction cannot be given.

Selecting A Content Creation Laptop

Computer marketing departments typically do not promote all company products. Rather they focus on high margin products.

Data Recording and Transmission: Error Correction II - Part 17

Here we look at one of the first practical error-correcting codes to find wide usage. Richard Hamming worked with early computers and became frustrated when errors made them crash. The rest is history.