OWC USB-C Travel Dock Lightens the Load for On-the-Move Journalists

If you’re a journalist carrying around an ultra-lightweight laptop computer — say Apple’s diminutive Macbook — you know there’s a big tradeoff for the lack of a heavy load to carry. These computers have only a single USB-C connector and it is needed for AC power. Until OWC’s new USB-C Travel Dock, there was no simple way to connect standard peripherals without carrying a slew of outboard connectors.

OWC has solved the problem with its tiny OWC USB-C Travel Dock ($49.78). The dock plugs into the computer and offers four ports of connectivity plus a power connector. Unlike most such docks, this one is so small it fits in your pocket. It weighs only 3.2 ounces.

It offers two USB 3.1, Gen 1 connections with Type A ports that work with all USB devices. It also features an HDMI 2.0 port for displays, projectors and TV sets, a UHS-II SD card reader and an auxiliary power port that delivers 60 watts of power to connected devices.

Connect your notebook to the OWC USB-C Travel Dock with the integrated USB-C cable and transform it into a mini workstation with five essential ports. It works with any computer with a USB Type-C or Thunderbolt 3 port.

The dock is not only sleek and slim, but it comes in a choice of Apple colors, including space gray, gold, rose gold or silver. It supports 4K resolution at 30Hz.

It’s so small (3.2 -inches wide, 3.2 inches deep and 0.7 inches high) that it fits virtually anywhere and it rids the user of the need to carry a lot of extra cables, adapters and other stuff on the road with them. It also comes with a two-year warranty.

We tested the OWC USB-C Travel Dock with a Macbook and it worked exactly as advertised. It allowed us to get rid of several adapters and cables we used to carry everywhere. It was as simple as plug and play.

Only a year ago, such a dock with this capability costs as much as $300. Not anymore. OWC has broken down the door with a $50 dock that does virtually all one needs.

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