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Sennheiser Adds Two-Channel Receiver to its XS Wireless 1 Series

Sennheiser has announced that it will be expanding its XS Wireless 1 series with the addition of a new two-channel receiver, the EM-XSW 1 DUAL.

Sennheiser said the receiver will be available separately or as part of two XSW 1 DUAL Sets that combine it with two wireless microphones using either the e 825 or e 835 capsule. These systems and the new receiver will be available in April, 2018.

The new XS Wireless DUAL Sets offer excellent live sound, ease of use and have been created with users such as weekend DJs, schools, houses of worship and hospitality venues on a budget in mind. The EM-XSW 1 DUAL two-channel receiver features automatic frequency management with one-touch synchronization, antenna switching diversity for reliable reception and intuitive, icon-based controls.

Each receiver has up to ten compatible, preset channels in eight frequency banks, and provides balanced XLR and unbalanced jack outputs.

“The EM-XSW 1 DUAL two-channel receiver will be compelling to users that would prefer to work with two mics and require a neat, one-unit set-up,” said Oliver Schmitz, Sennheiser’s product manager. “Like the other systems in the XSW 1 series, the DUAL Sets offer fast set-up, straightforward user operation and great sound.”

The XSW 1 DUAL Sets are available in various frequency ranges within the UHF band (A: 548-572 MHz, GB: 606-630 MHz, B: 614- 638 MHz, C: 766-790 MHz, D: 794-806 MHz, E: 821-832 MHz + 863-865 MHz, K: 925-937.5 MHz)

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