AEA Announces New Ribbon Mic Pre-Amp and Microphone

AEA has introduced the TRP2, a new two-channel ribbon microphone preamp with phantom power capability and 85dB of microphone gain with a super high-impedance of 63k ohms.

AEA also introduced a new lower cost version of its active R84 ribbon mic. The new R84A is a phantom-powered version of the R84 ribbon mic, yet improves gain by 12dB boost over passive models. The R84A is priced at $1299.

AEA said the TRP2 preamp now includes phantom power because recent trends have shown ribbon mics to have gradually shifted toward active electronics. Nearly half the microphones in the AEA line now require phantom power.

The TRP2 is also designed with an internal switch – called the no blow mode – which prevents P48 from ever turning on phantom power when first engaged.

The R84A has a custom transformer made in Germany, the same one in the Nuvo series microphones and the active R44, the A440. An active buffer board gives the user the flexibility to pair it with any preamp.

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