TSL Products Offers New SDI Audio Monitor

TSL Products, a provider of broadcast equipment, has announced the release of its new MPA1 Mix SDI audio monitor. Part of the MPA (Monitor Plus Audio) range, the MPA1 Mix SDI provides users with an intuitive yet flexible audio monitoring tool that enables quick and easy creation of audio monitor mixes comprised of embedded SDI audio, AES and analogue audio sources.

At only 1RU high and 100mm deep, the TSL Products MPA1 Mix SDI audio monitor is ideal for use in most space-confined environments, such as outside broadcast vehicles and lightweight flight-packs. Equipped with two 3G/HD/SD-SDI inputs, as well as AES and analogue audio inputs, the new MPA1 Mix SDI allows customers to simultaneously monitor as many as 16 audio channels of their choosing. Mixes can be created using any of the available audio sources, whether embedded in SDI or presented as AES, analogue or any combination thereof.

Stephen Brownsill, Audio Product Manager at TSL Products, said that up to 16 separate audio mixes can be remotely created and then recalled directly on the front panel of the unit using the MPA1 Mix SDI Web page and the simple network management protocol (SNMP).

“This allows our customers to address differing applications and achieve more efficient workflows,” he said.

All system parameters can be controlled remotely over an Ethernet network using the built-in Web server, while audio levels, signal status and formats can also be viewed remotely via the web GUI (graphics user interface). The MPA1 Mix SDI also displays audio level meters and mix configurations on its front panel display as well as 3G/HD/SD SDI video sources.

An HDMI output provides convenient confidence monitoring of any chosen 3G/HD/SD SDI video source on any external HDMI monitor, the output of which is also stored as part of the 16 mix states.

In related news: Following the successful launch of the MPA1 Solo SDI, TSL Products continues to bring improvements to the entire MPA1 range as part of its free software updates program. The latest MPA1 software release now includes improved audio level metering for all MPA1 Solo products. Not only are the new audio level displays easier to read in even the most demanding environments, Brownsill said, but they now include integral phase meters as standard.

“Additionally, in accordance with helping our customers navigate the transition from SDI to IP infrastructures, both our MPA1 Solo Dante and MPA1 Mix Dante products are now AES67 compliant, making them suitable for customers planning to adopt SMPTE 2110 networks,” he said.

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